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cardiomyocyte membrane currents glucose pathway Transfected HEK293 cell EM of cardiomyocyte

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TTX molecule

The Cardiovascular Research Group is studying how the heart generates and maintains its regular beat, and controls its force of contraction.

Eric Accili is studying proteins that enable the heart to initiate its own rhythm independently of the nervous system.

Chris Ahern's laboratory has moved to the University of Iowa.

David Fedida and Steven Kehl are studying how the heart generates, maintains and regulates electrical activity. Electrical potential is transmitted across the heart as the cells alternately depolarize and re-polarize, due to the coordinated action of a multitude of intramembrane proteins. Any defects in this action can trigger atrial fibrillation and a variety of ventricular arrhythmias.

Harley Kurata studies regulatory mechanisms of inwardly-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels. Current research is aimed towards identifying novel interactors and regulators of channel function, and investigating the detailed mechanisms of Kir channel gating and blockade.

Edwin Moore is studying the mechanisms which control excitation-contraction coupling in muscle cells.

Filip van Petegem is investigating the structure and function of calcium channels and ryanodine receptors using protein crystallography as well as electrophysiological and biochemical techniques

We are located in the new Life Sciences Institute at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. The LSI, as well as other groups on and off the UBC campus, includes investigators in a variety of areas in the Life Sciences. The environment is stimulating and diverse, and there is access to excellent core facilities and support. We maintain collaborations with investigators in Vancouver, the rest of Canada, the United States and Europe.

Kir
Life Sciences Institute
Vancouver, BC

© Cardiovascular Research Group 2008.